How to Make Floating Corner Shelves

Often the corners of the rooms are empty, although there is one way to use them rationally – equip the corners. Floating Corner Shelves favorably compare with the standard ones in appearance and, most importantly, save free space in rooms with a small footage.

They are sold in a furniture store and made to order, however, independent construction will also not cause difficulties. Today we will tell you how to correctly place such furniture in the house, choose the right materials for manufacturing and make corner shelves from wood, chipboard, glass and metal-plastic cladding without the help of professionals.

Using shelving is a great way to organize and de-clutter a space… We would like to show you how to make some clean shelving that appears to have no brackets (i.e., floating shelves). You can make them for less than 100 bucks, and the hardest part is figuring out what you’re going to put on them when you’re finished.

Floating Corner Shelves

Floating Corner shelves on the wall

Hanging corner shelves are good because they allow you to free up space under other furniture. Typically, such shelves are used for storing books, souvenirs and other small things. It is also convenient to put flowers, icons, telephone, bathroom and kitchen accessories. We will consider the nuances of creating models suitable for each of these cases and start with a corner shelf for the living room.

Corner shelves save space in the room

Shelves for flowers, souvenirs and other trifles are made of metal, drywall, glass, but the most popular material is still wood and its substitutes – they are practical, easy to clean and easy to work with at home. To save money, wooden planks (MDF, chipboard) can not be taken in full size, but selected from the market on leftovers, there are often pieces of suitable size for the shelves.

In addition to the material, you will need woodworking tools: a drill, a puzzle, sandpaper, a tape measure, a ruler and a marker for marking. You can not do without fasteners (screws, dowels) and tape for cutting the edges.

The considered decorative shelf on the wall consists of three levels connected by side walls. First, we make a drawing drawing and indicate the dimensions of the components on it. Then we make individual parts from cardboard or paper and transfer them to the material, in the case under consideration – laminated particle board, surrounding the contour with a marker or the edge of an office knife.

Supplies:
This is list is for the three shelves built for a specific space. You can modify as needed for your own space.

  • Six 2 x 4s
  • Two 1 x 8 x 12 kiln-dried cedar (be sure to check for warping when choosing your lumber)
  • One 1/4″ x 4′ x 8′ playwood
  • 1 1/4″ wood screws (I used these)
  • Heavy duty fasteners (I used these)
  • Spackle
  • Paint
  • Caulk
  • Wood glue

Tools:

  • Miter saw
  • Table saw
  • Drill
  • Kreg pocket hole jig
  • Sandpaper
  • Sander
  • Level
  • Step ladder (ones like this are good since they don’t take up a lot of space and have the shelf on top)
  • Stud finder

Step One: Cut all your wood. I find it more productive if I figure out all (or at least most) wood material I need and cut it all at once. You have to make sure all of your measurements are spot-on, or like dominoes, everything will fall apart if you get one measurement wrong, which is a real bummer. If you think of the project as a whole, that all the pieces relate to each other, then it should run smoothly. Hey, if I can do it, you can too.

Here’s the cut list for three shelves:

  • Fifteen 6 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ *
  • Three 26 1/2″ x 1 1/2″ **
  • Three 46″ x 1 1/2″ **
  • Three 28″ x 8 5/8″ ***
  • Three 20″ x 1 1/2″ ***
  • Three 37 3/8″ x 8 5/8″ ***
  • Three 37 3/8″ x 1/5″ ***

*2 x 4
**ripped 2 x 4
***ripped 1 x 8

Cut list for skinning the bottom and ends (1/4″ plywood):

  • Eight 5/8″ x 46″
  • Eight 5/8″ x 26 1/2″
  • Six 2 1/8″ x 8 5/8″

Sand pieces that will be visible.

Step Two: Assemble figure A (see diagram). I found it easier to clamp down the 1 1/2″ piece before screwing in the 6 1/2 x 3 1/2 pieces. I put in two screws per piece.

Step Three: Assemble the pieces for figure B (see diagram).

Step Four: Alright, now’s the fun part. I’m sure you already have a space picked out. A good way to visualize spacing is to use painter’s tape (Laura dropped that knowledge on me). Once you have the spacing all set up, studs found, and material at hand, you can start putting up the shelves. 

I started at the bottom and worked my way up. Install all of the A pieces first. The HeadLOK fasteners did a great job of making everything super sturdy; just make sure you’re hitting studs! After you have the A pieces up, you can put on the B pieces. You can screw or nail those on. Hopefully your walls are nice and square!

Step Five: Putty any nail or screw holes. One thing I wish I would have done is caulk around the shelves so that there were no spaces showing. I think they still look good, but that detail would have made them a little bit better. Sand once everything is dry; I attached my vacuum hose to the sander to minimize dust. Tape the wall if you are going to paint another color.

Once you paint, you’re done! Time to put your stuff on display (after the paint dries, of course). 

Add a few cool frames with prints, plants, books with unique bookends and your shelves are ready to go! We’ve got lots of wood DIY projects in our archives (like building custom shelves and dollhouses) so make sure to see if any of those strike your fancy as well!

Floating Corner Shelves

How to build your own floating corner shelves.Keyword DIY Author Josh Rhodes

Ingredients

  • six 2’x4′
  • two 1 x 8 x 12 kiln-dried cedar 
  • one 1/4″ x 4′ x 8′ plywood
  • 1 1/4″ wood screws
  • heavy duty fasteners
  • spackle
  • paint
  • caulk
  • wood glue
  • miter & table saw
  • drill
  • pocket hole jig
  • sander & paper
  • level
  • stud finder optional, but useful

Instructions

  1. Cut all your wood. I find it more productive if I figure out all (or at least most) wood material I need and cut it all at once. You have to make sure all of your measurements are spot-on, or like dominoes, everything will fall apart if you get one measurement wrong, which is a real bummer. If you think of the project as a whole, that all the pieces relate to each other, then it should run smoothly. See post for the cut list I used for these floating shelves.
  2. Sand pieces that will be visible.
  3. Assemble figure A (see diagram). I found it easier to clamp down the 1 1/2″ piece before screwing in the 6 1/2 x 3 1/2 pieces. I put in two screws per piece.
  4. Assemble the pieces. I have included diagrams in the post you can also print to use for this project.
  5. I’m sure you already have a space picked out. A good way to visualize spacing is to use painter’s tape (Laura dropped that knowledge on me). Once you have the spacing all set up, studs found, and material at hand, you can start putting up the shelves. I started at the bottom and worked my way up. Install all of the A pieces first. The HeadLOK fasteners did a great job of making everything super sturdy; just make sure you’re hitting studs! After you have the A pieces up, you can put on the B pieces. You can screw or nail those on.
  6. Screw or nail on the underside and end pieces.
  7. Putty any nail or screw holes. One thing I wish I would have done is caulk around the shelves so that there were no spaces showing. I think they still look good, but that detail would have made them a little bit better. Sand once everything is dry; I attached my vacuum hose to the sander to minimize dust. Tape the wall if you are going to paint another color.
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